boats (127)

81-Year-Old Sailing the High Seas

Here is a 2020 update on Swedish world sailor Sven Yrvind, whose lifetime of solo sailing was documented in Tiny Homes on the Move (pp. 148-151). Here are a few glimpses of what we referred to as “Sven’s Next Boat” on p. 151, and a 15-minute interview.

“At sea, I can find my youth.”

Note: 30% discount on 2 or more of our books, plus free shipping and money-back-if-not-completely-satisfied (beats Amazon): www.shelterpub.com

From Canyon Haverfield

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Low-Tech Catamaran

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A year or so ago, a large pine tree fell into one of the main channels of our lagoon, blocking boat access. The county finally decided to remove it. I thought they’d get a crane, but the tree company hit upon this ingenious low-tech solution: a two-canoe catamaran, decked with 2×4s and plywood, which they loaded up with chunks of the tree, then had their boat pulled with a rope to an access point, where they loaded the wood onto a truck.

Reminds me of the many ingenious low-tech workarounds I’ve seen in Mexico, like a crowbar made out of rebar, or fishermen whose gear amounts to a bottle wrapped with fishing line; they go to the beach with this in their pocket, then spool the line off the bottle twirl it around their head and cast into the surf.

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Surfer’s Shack by Bruno Atkey on the “Wild Coast” of British Columbia

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Surfer’s shack built by Bruno Atkey on the “Wild Coast,” about 40 miles by north of Tofino (reachable only by sea–no roads), on the west side of Vancouver Island. We went in Bruno’s 17-foot aluminum fishing boat, with 50 HP rope-pull-starter outboard motor), stayed there a couple of nights, fished, surfed, drank whiskey, and took a driftwood-fired sauna when I was shooting photos for Builders of the Pacific Coast. Bruno was one of the first surfers on Vancouver Island.

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Tiny Home in Maine

April 6, 2020

Dear Lloyd,

A photo of our daughter’s house

I have been reading your books for years (and have given them to my kids) and, more recently, your blog. I studied architecture in college (in the 70’s) and when your Shelter book came out I wore it out reading it. It has influenced the last forty years of my life as a builder/carpenter.

Ours is a relatively sustainable and self sufficient lifestyle, and one our kids have adopted as well. Our daughter has been living for the last 5 years in a 7′×10′ house she built, with no electricity or running water, and is building a traditional Washington County peapod (a double-ended wooden rowboat). Our son is currently living in a 42″ wide × 10′ long shelter he built to live in, while building a tiny house for a college acquaintance. before that he was living on a 36′ sailboat he fixed up and sailed solo across the Atlantic to the Azores.

We are preparing to sell the house in which our two kids were born and grew up, and on which we have worked for the last forty years. My wife created a website so we can sell the house ourselves and I thought, perhaps, you might like to see the photos of the house.

Here’s a link to the website richmondmainefarmhouse.com

Thanks for all the inspiration — just wanted you to know that you’ve had quite an impact on our lives.

Best wishes to you,
Joe Stanley

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Sailboat Sauna in British Columbia

About two years ago I was standing in the shower and had a vision of a sailboat turned unto a sauna. When I got out and dried off I started drawing plans. It felt like it was what I should be doing, so I just kept building it until it was done. The boat was originally called the Sea Mystic, we painted a “T” and an “M” in the name to make it Steam Mystic (my brother’s idea).

I live in Victoria BC and love designing and building things like saunas, tiny homes, surfboards, small shops. For me, it’s about more creative designs, more diversity in the world, more mystery. I like to follow my gut when it comes to design; there is an emotion that I’m trying to bring to life. Sometimes my hands can capture what I feel, and what I dream for the world; sometimes they can’t.

–Nick
Nicolas Joel Van Buren
Ontological Creative
Victoria BC, Canada

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