gardening (187)

Opium Poppy

Opium Poppy

I have just discovered the magnification functions of my iPhone 11 Pro Max. How about this for a flower’s invitation to honeybees? Beauty leads to nectar.

Post a comment

1860s Farmhouse on 12½ Acres in Maine, $325,000

1860s Farmhouse on 12.5 Acres in Maine, 5,000We are a carpenter/gardener couple who have been restoring our 1860s Greek Revival farmhouse for the last 30+ years. One of our goals has been to live self-sufficiently and conscientiously, and we believe our home and gardens uniquely reflect this.

The house includes three bedrooms, a large beautiful kitchen, dining room, living room, library/office, studio, pantry, mudroom, two full bathrooms, and an airy, screened and glassed-in sunporch. Connected to the house by a long porch, is a 25′×36′ two-story shop/studio, and a woodshed and storage area.

Behind the house are established organic vegetable, and perennial flower gardens, fruit trees, and blueberry and raspberry bushes. A Nearing style 10′×20′ stone, glass and wood greenhouse extends the gardening season at both ends, and provides a lovely refuge on sunny, cold winter days.

Hard as it is for us to leave this, our children are grown and we no longer need this much space and the large gardens. We hope a younger family looking for a similar lifestyle will get as much joy from it as we have.

–Joe Stanley

House and 12.5 acres – $325,000: richmondmainefarmhouse.com/house | woodtools@yahoo.com

Post a comment

Tiny Home in Maine

April 6, 2020

Dear Lloyd,

A photo of our daughter’s house

I have been reading your books for years (and have given them to my kids) and, more recently, your blog. I studied architecture in college (in the 70’s) and when your Shelter book came out I wore it out reading it. It has influenced the last forty years of my life as a builder/carpenter.

Ours is a relatively sustainable and self sufficient lifestyle, and one our kids have adopted as well. Our daughter has been living for the last 5 years in a 7′×10′ house she built, with no electricity or running water, and is building a traditional Washington County peapod (a double-ended wooden rowboat). Our son is currently living in a 42″ wide × 10′ long shelter he built to live in, while building a tiny house for a college acquaintance. before that he was living on a 36′ sailboat he fixed up and sailed solo across the Atlantic to the Azores.

We are preparing to sell the house in which our two kids were born and grew up, and on which we have worked for the last forty years. My wife created a website so we can sell the house ourselves and I thought, perhaps, you might like to see the photos of the house.

Here’s a link to the website richmondmainefarmhouse.com

Thanks for all the inspiration — just wanted you to know that you’ve had quite an impact on our lives.

Best wishes to you,
Joe Stanley

Post a comment

Wonderful Houses Around the World

Wonderful Houses around the WorldYesterday I read in the paper that sales of children’s books are booming, due to schools being closed. This brought to mind our one and only children’s book, Wonderful Houses Around the World, by photographer Yoshio Komatsu and artist Akira Nishiyama.

There are 10 photographs by Yoshio of homes in different parts of the world. All the homes are built of natural materials — earth, wood, thatch, sod, bamboo, and stone.

Each photo is followed by a watercolor drawing of the inside of that home, showing the children and their parents going about their everyday activities: food gathering and processing, cooking, sleeping, working and playing.

The book is timely in this day and age: it shows what people do in their homes. Timely also because it’s great educational material for kids being home-schooled: look at what what kids your age are doing in other parts of the planet.

Yoshio is my favorite photographer of homes in the world. Not only are the homes invariably soulful, but his composition and lighting are perfect — and he has a knack for making people feel comfortable, so that the homeowners look natural, often laughing.

The book is $12.95 and you can order it through your independent bookstore, or from:

Note: We have a money-back guarantee on all of our books (no matter where you buy them). If for any reason you are dissatisfied, call us and we’ll return the full purchase price plus shipping. No need to return the book.

Post a comment (1 comment)

Our Friends in Brazil

We have been talking recently to our friends at the Solisluna publishing company in Brazil about translating our book Shelter into Portuguese. We sent them a copy of our new book, The Half-Acre Homestead, along with three of our mini-books and our wooden model of a tiny home. They just sent us this email and photo.

Hi Lloyd,

I hope you’re doing well.

I received your material yesterday and I would like to thank you a lot for sending me this marvelous book!

Here in Solisluna, we’re all enchanted by it. Wonderful work, so meaningful.

A great legacy for the world. Congratulations to you and Lesley.

Best wishes from Bahia,
Kin and Solisluna team

P.S.: Shelter has been translated into Spanish, French, German, Japanese, and Korean.

Post a comment