design (151)

Tiny Home in Scottish Highlands

Hi Lloyd,

Just a quick email to update you, and send a photo of our small house in the NW Highlands.
We spoke a few years ago, when you were over in Scotland, heading up this way see Bernard Planterose. Sadly we could not meet, but I thought you would like to see our tiny, but much loved home.

It is approx 40msq (about 430 sq. ft.) – the exterior is larch timber and ‘wriggley’ tin. The interior is CLP – heavily insulated with sheep’s wool.

We have a small office, a compost loo, a main living, cooking and sleeping area with a climb up bed and a compact bathroom. There are floor to ceiling windows to the front of the house – we feel like we are sitting on the deck of a ship – watching the ever changing sea loch and the birds and mammals that call it home. Heat comes from an old Jotul wood stove, power from 6 solar panels, a battery bank and inverter (we have a 24 +12v system) and we use bottled gas for a cooker and boiler. In the summer we run a small freezer and camping fridge, in the winter a hole in an outside wall!

“Twoflower Croft” has been our home for almost two years. We are still finishing soak aways and retaining walls, planting trees, planting gardens – but we are getting there.
… Our friend Sam Booth from Echo Living made our plans a reality, and it is to him, and to you we owe a huge debt. It is wonderful to know that there are people out there celebrating the fact that that simple, small houses – designed for the life that the owners live – make the most perfect homes.

Huge respect and best wishes from Scotland, hope you find yourself here again soon.

Sara Garnett

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Tiny Home in France

Hi Lloyd,

Here are some more photos of our tiny house that we just finished building for our family of four, out here in the countryside of central France.

We (my partner and I) started the design process last summer (just before finding out that she was pregnant), started construction in October, and moved in in February, just in time for our baby to be born in the “living room”!

We spent a lot of time working on a design that would be both functional and comfortable, allowing us to meet the needs of our daily life while maintaining enough open space to move around and play without stepping on each other.  We achieved this by pushing the kitchen and bathroom to either end of the main level, keeping the rest of the space relatively open, aside from our built-in couch and bench, which cover the wheel wells.  High ceilings, large windows, light colors and lots of natural light compliment this design, leaving our main living space feeling light, open and spacious despite its small size.

When we say small, however, we should mention that this house is quite large compared to other tiny houses, at least in France. Since we were designing a space to live in for a minimum of a few years with two small but growing children, we were rather ambitious and really pushed the limits of what is possible size-wise. The house’s large size meant we had to be really careful about the materials we used, so as not to overweigh the 3.5-ton weight limit in France.  For this reason, we used lightweight, thin poplar for the floors and wall coverings, and most of the interior furniture, as well as exterior siding, is removable to minimize weight during transport.  In other words, it’s not a house that is meant to be moved too frequently.
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Old Victorian House in Watsonville

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This old beauty along side Hwy. One in Watsonville, surrounded by 10 acres of organic strawberries and vegetables. Neglected, but the bones are still good. Called the Redman House, it:

“…was constructed in 1897 and designed by William H. Weeks, who was responsible for the design of hundreds of unique buildings throughout California. It was a classic Queen Anne — it featured a rounded corner tower with a turret, gables with meticulously carved panels, Palladian windows and dentil molding. The intricate detailing that Weeks designed for the exterior of the home could also was found inside — expensive and decorative wood, including eastern oak and bird’s eye maple, were used for doors, mantles, and window casings.”

-Wikipedia

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