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natural materials (247)

Shingled Cabin in France

Shingled Cabin in France

I am Bastien Forestier. I live in Boussy Saint Antoine near Paris. One year ago, in the winter, I was driving across Normandy to go surfing. On my way I stumbled upon la Chappelle D’Allouville, a mystical wooden treehouse made by a monk in 1609. So I decided to build a shelter using this technique.

I began doing wood shingles and beams. First with axes, then I bought a shaking axe.

I used the trees around me. I know them all since my childhood. Now after a year i have a roof and walls. I am very sure to make more houses like this in the future, inspired by Tingely’s cyclops maybe.

I like that the people in the neighborhood call it La Chapelle (the chapel).

Note: These are actually shakes, rather than shingles.  –LK

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Louie Frazier and the Connection Between Our Books Shelter and Home Work

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Louie Frazier and the Connection Between our Books Shelter and Home Work

I was photographing Jack Williams’ house in Point Arena, Calif. in 2000, and he said, “There’s someone up here who wants to meet you.”

We drove about 5 miles out of town, down into a riverfront valley, and I saw this beautiful little building. The two doors were open, and this guy, who I’d never seen before came out with an old tattered copy of Shelter, and he told me to crouch down in the doorway and look at the building’s framing. See this? He said? I built it from this painting (of a Mandan earth lodge) in Shelter.

Wow I thought, If Shelter inspired something like this, it’s time to do a sequel.

So Home Work, published in 2004 was born, and it featured lots of buildings inspired by Shelter.

BTW, the other day Louie said that back in the day, the saying was: “Turn on, tune in, drop out, and read Shelter.”

Note: With a 30% discount for 2 or more books, you can now get both Shelter and Home Work for $41 with free shipping: www.shelterpub.com

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Yurts in Cornwall

I recently got an Instagram post from Lisa Mudie at Mill Valley Yurts in Cornwall, U.K, along with some photos. (They rent yurts and cabins in a rural setting.) I asked her to email me, and she wrote:

“Thirteen years ago we started a rustic campsite in our beautiful Cornish Valley a few miles from the rugged Atlantic coast which has evolved over the years into a crazy mix of hobbit huts, wooden yurts, cabins, and gypsy vardos. All handmade by us using reclaimed materials and all Cornish timber. Our latest purchase is a mobile sawmill and 26 tonnes of local oak … now we can really start building!”

Yurts in Cornwall

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Surfer’s Shack by Bruno Atkey on the “Wild Coast” of British Columbia

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Surfer’s shack built by Bruno Atkey on the “Wild Coast,” about 40 miles by north of Tofino (reachable only by sea–no roads), on the west side of Vancouver Island. We went in Bruno’s 17-foot aluminum fishing boat, with 50 HP rope-pull-starter outboard motor), stayed there a couple of nights, fished, surfed, drank whiskey, and took a driftwood-fired sauna when I was shooting photos for Builders of the Pacific Coast. Bruno was one of the first surfers on Vancouver Island.

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Bamboo Building in Colombia

This is a four-story coffee drying plant built in the late 1800s on the banks of the Guacaica River in Caldas, Colombia. The entire building is framed with bamboo, structurally remarkable for the size of the building and the heavy tile roof. From the book Tropical Bamboo by Marcello Villegas; One of the best books ever on bamboo. All the buildings, furniture, and other bamboo objects in the book are in Colombia.

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Studio on the Pond in BC

Roger Warren just sent this, along with this description of his studio on an island in British Columbia:

Lloyd… The studio was put together from scrounged everything, total investment under $300 that was mostly for floor ply. Size is 8 × 12.

Something you have never mentioned in any of your books (I have them all): Any building should be designed around multiples of 4. This fits in with standard construction lumber; i.e.: If you build 10 × 10, you (have to) cut off 2 ft. of floor ply.

I also designed and built the house, shown in my website.

www.rogeronsaltspring.com/gallery-iii

I also have the same tools you do.

Cheers Lloyd,
–Roger

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Two Cabins on Washington State Island

We received these photos last week, from Vashon Island, which is in Puget Sound.

Hi Lloyd,

The A-frame cabin was built in the late 1960s by Tony Arndt, and my family purchased the property in 1978. My late Aunt Mary lived in it for some time with her son. I think she replaced the cedar shingles on the front and possibly the windows. Sadly, it is falling down now, I do believe beyond repair.

The newer cabin is my 12′ by 16′ cabin with a loft. All materials for windows and doors were salvaged for free. I’m trying to incorporate design elements from the forest as well as repurposing wood from the old cabin.

During the same time, my father and mother, myself and 2 brothers lived in a small one-room cabin and a bus on another part of the property, which is where I am building my cabin. There’s a 3rd larger cabin on the property built from all old-growth timber by my father. The property had no power or water when we purchased it in 1978. We dug our own well during the 1980s, and put power in.

–Chris Ramsell

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