recycling (74)

Old Barns For Sale in Vermont

Last month, we received this letter:

Hi Lloyd

I wanted to follow up on the email I wrote earlier this week about Luke Larson, a talented historic timber framer.

Luke is currently restoring a corn crib (and several other barns built in the 1700s.) I am sure that your readers would be fascinated by Luke’s outstanding craftsmanship. He would be able to share incredible insight about his techniques, the buildings he saves and the beautiful new timber frame structures he builds.

Let me know if you would be interested in an article.

Thanks!
Rachel (Kaplan)

Here is the article:

Green Mountain Timber Frames, a small company based in Middletown Springs, Vermont, specializes in transforming vintage, hand hewn timber frames into custom homes, studios, additions, and barns. Luke Larson now owns the company and operates it with a dedicated staff of craftspeople and history buffs. Luke is passionate about preserving the history that resides in old timber frame structures, and digs into the generations of folks who have built, cared for, and used these buildings. The structures undergo a complete restoration and are put back up on new foundations, ready to stand tall and true with integrity for many generations to come. Luke and his team are dedicated to preserving the craftsmanship from the past, as well as being students and teachers of the crafts of yesteryear. Take a look to see his current barns for sale.

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Deek Diedrickson Rolls On

From our pal Deek:

A little backstory on this one: It’s a full-time dwelling that I led the build on for a friend (Alex Eaves: re-use advocate / filmmaker / co‑builder) in 2017. The goal was to create a mobile tiny home (decor and all) with a large percentage of discarded, salvaged, and dumpster-dived materials (over 80% easily). The final decor and construction budget was under $800 as a result. This doesn’t factor in the cost of the secondhand truck (around $8k).

The 17′ “box” of this former U-Haul moving truck now contains two sleeping levels, a small kitchen, a work-desk area, and even a nautical-style wet bath (toilet and shower stall). It will be featured in a documentary film we have been working on that will show the design process and educate “how,” from start to finish. People can head to BoxTruckFilm.com for more information.

(This is a great website; also, see Deek’s work at relaxshacks.blogspot.com.

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Dining Table from Recycled Wood

Table is 9″ long, 32″ wide, 2½″ thick Douglas Fir. I’ve made about 6 tables out of 2″ or 3″ recycled* Douglas Fir. It’s strong, relatively cheap, and got beautiful grain.

*In the ’60s-’70s, we called it “used wood.”

(With the driftwood book off at the printers, I’m getting back into working on my half-acre homestead book.)

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Handmade/Homemade: The Half Acre Homestead

When I start working on a book, it’s like setting out on an ocean voyage without a map. I get a theme, an idea, some kind of coherence on a subject,* then start.

When I built my first house in Mill Valley in the early ’60s, my friend Bob Whiteley and I laid out the foundation lines in chalk on the ground. “What do we do now, Bob,” I asked.

Bob said “This,” and took pick and shovel and started digging the foundation trench.

It’s been my M.O. all my life. When I don’t know what to do, I start. Things (usually) sort themselves out in the process. (I know, I know, I’ve said all this before…)

This book is about the tools and techniques Lesley and I have evolved in building a home and growing food (and creating a bunch of things) on a small piece of land over a 40+-year period.

I started by writing it in chapters: The House / The Kitchen / Kitchen Tools / The Garden / Garden Tools / Chickens / Food / Foraging/ /Fishing / The Shop / Shop / Shop Tools / Roadkill / Critters…What we’ve learned; what’s worked, what hasn’t…

Then I went through some 50,000 digital pictures and picked out 7-800 photos, printed them out contact sheets (12-up) and started organizing them under the above categories.

Next step: starting to put pages together; I am totally excited. I have (kind of unknowingly) been gathering material for this book for decades.

Now I gotta get out of here. Not only is it a gorgeous fresh spring day, but it’s my time of the year. Tauruses are feelin good…

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Gambrel Roof Home, Corvallis, Oregon

This was in a large field, maybe 2 acres. It looks like it could be fixed up for living. I always look to see if the eaves are sagging in old buildings; if not, it probably means the foundation is OK. There wasn’t a “for sale” sign, but if I lived up there, I’d track it down. It could be a great home, with a lot of land for gardening, chickens, a few farm animals.

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