tiny houses (482)

Driftwood Shacks Book Now Available

This is the second edition of this book, doubled in size, and printed on a Heidelberg press. (The first edition was a print-on-demand book done on an inkjet press.)

You can preview parts of the book here: www.shelterpub.com/driftwood-flipbook-sample

Hardcover • 8½” by 8½” • $19.95
160 pages • 176 color photos
ISBN 978-0-936070-80-3

It’s available in bookstores, or on our website here: www.shelterpub.com/building/driftwood

Post a comment (2 comments)

Tom’s Tiny Home

Tom made this meticulous tiny home, cutting out all the mini-shingles by hand. It’s 7″ wide, 16″ long, 10″ high (to peak of gable). It was made for us to use as a display when selling our book Tiny Homes at fairs.

The best way to buy books is in an independent bookstore. But if you buy books online, see our website for a 30% discount, free shipping (in USA), for 2 or more books. We beat Amazon.

Post a comment

Jay Nelson’s Latest Treehouse

Jay Nelson’s latest treehouse, now under construction in a redwood grove in Northern California. It’s about 10 by 11 feet in floor area. The round window pivots open on center pins. There are two climbing ropes attached high up so Jay and Max can work on the curved roof. Almost all the wood (except for floor framing and plywood sheathing) is used.

Post a comment (1 comment)

SunRay Kelley’s New Tiny Home on Wheels For Sale

From SunRay’s website:

This 20′ vardo is off-grid ready. Solar panels run a high-efficiency solar refrigerator and 12-volt lighting. The wood-fired heater heats 14 gallons of hot water while it heats your home. A propane stove and oven additionally warm this tiny home when you make tea or bake.

www.sunraykelley.com/home-on-wheels

Post a comment

Sculptural Sauna by Travis Skinner

Hey Lloyd, We just finished this sauna, we wanted to share it with ya.

–Travis Skinner

“The Anglerfish Sauna is a wood-fired sauna on wheels! It was built by the Hundred Handed Ones architectural collective that I started in collaboration with Travis Conn.

We use sculptural forms in architectural works. The Anglerfish Sauna showcases these principles in an experience. We ask the audience to step into the work and experience natural forms inspired by life.”

Check out the details here: the fins over the tires, the spine, the light, the teeth…

Travis built a unique tiny home on wheels that was featured in our book Small Homes.

Check out his very creative and highly-crafted designs at pairoducks.blogspot.com.

Post a comment (1 comment)

Shelter in The City

In Berkeley Tuesday. It’s so heartbreaking to see what’s going on in the cities these days, a result of the great transfer of wealth to the upper 10%.

The name of our company is Shelter. When we started in the early ’70s, it was a positive thing to build your own house or somehow create your own shelter. Don’t pay rent; don’t get locked into a bank with a mortgage. Because I’ve built my own home(s), I’ve never paid rent or had mortgage payments — think what that’s meant over a 50 year period!  These days, things are desperate. You see it everywhere, but especially in housing, as the politicians in charge of the US government continue to skew things in favor of the rich at the expense of the poor and middle class.

The principles, as shown amply in our 7 building books, are still the same these days:
1. Keep it small. The heart of our book Shelter, published 45 years ago, was a section with plans for 5 small homes. Shelter II has plans for another 5 homes.
2. Look around in cities and towns for small fixer-uppers.
3. Do as much for yourself as possible, with your own hands. You don’t have to do it all. Do what you can — it’ll pay off in increased independence and savings (and satisfaction).

Shameless Commerce Dept.: Shelter is 30% off for the rest of September, with free shipping. Two or more books are 30% off at any time. We encourage you to buy books from independent booksellers, but IF you buy books online, buying them from us is cheaper than Amazon.

Post a comment (2 comments)

Curved-Roof Shed

This is 10′ by 10′. Rafters made of four 1″ by 4″ by ⅜″ redwood bender board, 16′ long, bent, glued and clamped together. Roof sheathing is 1 × 6 redwood fence boards from Home Depot. Siding is ⅜″ rough-sawn exterior DF plywood. Eventually I’ll panel the inside with used fence boards. Flooring is used yellow pine T&G from Heritage Salvage in Petaluma. Windows (used) from Urban Ore in Berkeley.

Billy Cummings has done most of the work here, including cutting and fitting double-wall polycarbonate greenhouse glazing under the curved eaves.

Next step is to build a sliding door for one half of the end wall shown here so a bed can be rolled out onto the deck for nighttime star gazing. Jay Nelson built a sliding door for his shop that gave me the idea.

Note: A curved roof is infinitely more time-consuming (In many ways) as compared with, say, a shed roof or a gable roof. BUT the space underneath is wonderful and something I highly recommend for tiny homes. If you take the time to build a roof like this, it will give you a feeling of spaciousness and avoid the claustrophobia of small spaces. Curved roofs are the secret to the good feeling in Gypsy wagons (vardos).

Hey, I’m starting to get the hang of doing layout in WordPress — a lot more options than Blogger.

Post a comment (3 comments)