animals (123)

Bernie Harberts On the Road Again with Two Mules

Bernie Harberts’ 2500-mile odyssey in a mule-drawn covered wagon from Canada to Mexico was featured in our book Tiny Homes (pp. 188-190). Here’s the latest from Bernie:

Dear Lloyd and Shelter,

Just wanted to let you know I’ve started a new journey.

It’s called Mules West and I thought you’d enjoy following along.

So far my mules Brick, Cracker, and I have traveled 400 miles and encountered snow, snakes and fascinating folks that have helped us along the way. We’ve been heading from western North Carolina toward Idaho. Right now we’re in Indiana.

Traveling is more fun when you have company so come “ride along with us” at RiverEarth.com.

I hope all is going well with you.

Happy Adventuring!

–Bernie

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Fox Meets Coyote

Coyote alongside Highway One. I’ve seen him several times. He seems curious about humans. The trickster. I hope people aren’t feeding him.

Fox was the only living man. There was no earth. The water was everywhere.

“What shall I do,” Fox asked himself. He began to sing in order to find out.

“I would like to meet somebody,” he sang to the sky.

Then he met Coyote.

“I thought I was going to meet someone,” Fox said.

“Where are you going?” Coyote asked.

“I been wandering all over trying to find someone.

I was worried there for a while.”

“Well, it’s better for two people to go together … That’s what they always say.”

“Okay. But what will we do?”

“I don’t know.”

“I got it! Let’s try to make the world.”

“And how are we going to do that?” Coyote asked.

“Sing!” said Fox.

–Jaime de Angulo, Indian Tales
(From the first page of Shelter)

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Wood Rat Nest

These nests are pyramidal, about 3 feet tall, all over in the woods around here. Woodrats are kinda nice critters, compared to disgusting Norwegian city rats. They’re like big mice, live communally, are craftily smart at getting bait off traps without springing the trigger. The ones around here are dusky-footed woodrats, often called “pack rats,” have white belies, and bigger ears and eyes than city rats.

They are herbivores and according to Andrew Santos:

Their lodges are architectural marvels with many entrances and lookouts. Ans interior rooms that service nests And pantries. They generally live solo in a matriarchal society of several lodges, comprising neighborhoods. Nests can get 6 to 8 feet tall.”

–From Homegrown: A Year in the Life of a Humboldt County Guerrilla Grower

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Photos On the Road

Reconstructed chapel at Fort Ross, Russian fur trapping post in the 1800s

Straight-line eaves on old barns indicate solid foundations. This one on road from Navarro to Boonville.

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