off-the-grid (11)

Tiny Home on Wheels from Recycled Materials in Australia

Dear Lloyd,

I’ve been meaning to write you this email for some time now, it feels long overdue.

I just wanted to express my gratitude for the inspiration that I have taken from your books (specifically Tiny Homes: Simple Shelter) which have helped lead me on a wonderful journey of DIY carpentry, natural building and constructing my own tiny houses on wheels from recycled materials. This book was the first time I’d ever seen a tiny house on wheels (8 years ago) and it blew my mind! I love the concept of being able to build and own my home without crippling debt, as well as separating land and home ownership. It has provided me with an ethical, soulful, affordable and flexible housing solution as a stepping stone to something bigger and more permanent in the future, as I know that I do not wish to raise a family in such a small space and am now getting into my mid-30s. Building my first tiny house took me out of the office as a left-leaning progressive town planner and into the world of creative carpentry and the DIY makers movement where I could lead by example and walk the talk. I’ve also now run workshops and helped on many other sustainable building and tiny house projects since taking the leap.

I designed and built my house in the eclectic woodbutcher’s style, which I know you were a part of pioneering in the ’60s and ’70s. A mix of recycled doors, windows and lovely cedar, Oregon cypress and Baltic pine, much of it old-growth timber reclaimed for free from old houses here in Australia. I even ended up with a beautiful geodesic dome lead-light window, a result of a carpenter mentor with a very mathematical brain who came up with the design and helped me to build it — but lesson learned, I don’t think I’ll be making too many more domes. Waterproofing them effectively is certainly a challenge…

Here is a link to some photos and a video tour of my first tiny house and recycled bathhouse in Byron Bay: www.livingbiginatinyhouse.com/tiny-home-with-bath-house-made-from-salvaged-windows

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Casting Call: DIY Network Looking for Off-Grid Home Builder

We just received this email.

Greetings,

My name is Gwendolyn Nix and I’m a casting producer with Warm Springs Productions (www.warmsprings.tv) and the DIY network. I’m currently casting the third season of DIY’s show “Building Off the Grid.” I’m reaching out to you to see if you or anyone you know would be interested in this opportunity.

We’re looking throughout the United States for folks who will soon be building an off-grid dwelling (i.e. starting within in the next few months). We cannot consider homes that are already underway.

All types of structures can be considered i.e. straw bale, earthship, tiny homes, yurts, container homes, earth-sheltered, log, stick-built, or whatever else your imagination comes up with! If you’re chosen for this project there is generous pay involved.

If you’re interested, please reach me at the contact information that follows my signature via either email or phone.

Please note, in order to be considered for the show, the home must be built on the land where it will ultimately exist (as opposed to being built in a warehouse and then transported to the land).

Here is a sneak peek link to the show: https://www.diynetwork.com/shows/building-off-the-grid

Thank you and I look forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Gwendolyn Nix
Casting Producer & Social Media Manager
Warm Springs Productions
Cell: 406-214-6405
Email: gnnix@warmsprings.tv
Available 9am-5pm Mountain Standard Time

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Solar-powered Schoolbus Cabin

Lloyd,

Like many, I scrounge the internet for building ideas. I came across a really cool dish-rack/shelf that was built into a corner in a kitchen. You could stand the plates up to dry between the slats, and still set bowls and mugs on it like a shelf. Brilliant! I saved the picture, and put it in the “barn-house” folder on my computer for future reference, when it comes time to build.

A few months ago, you posted a video of how you do dishes. I nearly leapt out of my seat when I saw the very same dish shelf… was in your kitchen! You have a long history of collecting and publishing all the good ideas you can find, I guess it shouldn’t be such a surprise that a design like that ended up in your home! https://www.theshelterblog.com/lloyds-dish-washing-method/

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Bernie Harbert and His Mule Polly’s 2,500-mile Voyage Across America

Hi Lloyd and Lew,

I just wanted to let you know that Rocky Mountain PBS premiers the Lost Sea Expedition series January 4th. The series will also stream on Amazon and Vimeo. The story about this tiny wagon voyage across America featured in Tiny Homes (pp. 188–189). I think this info would really interest theshelterblog.com readers.

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Kevin Kelly in Mongolia


“…The wildness is a deception. Scattered in nearly every vista of Mongolia are the round white tents of nomads. We know these tent houses as yurts; they call them ger (pronounced gair). They are the primary home to about 1 million nomads. Today’s nomads retain a lifestyle relatively unchanged from that of their forebears in important ways. Living as I do—in a world teeming with smartphones and Wi-Fi, smart TVs and self-driving cars—it is a remarkable thing to travel among them.

The nomads are herders and typically own about 1,000 animals—mostly sheep and goats, but cows, horses, dogs, camels, and yaks as well. You could think of them as ranchers who move their ranch seasonally. They set up their ger in spring for maximum summer pastures, then they move it again for winter feeding. This movement is not north to south as might be expected, but from lowlands to highlands, or even from open valley in summer to hidden hilly nook in winter to escape the wind, which is more punishing than the cold.…”

-Kevin Kelly

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You Can Take the Boy Out of Baja…

Monday early evening, March 13, 2017

I’m out in a wonderful thatched-roof domicile about 12 miles east of San José del Cabo; it looks out to the ocean and gets the sea breezes. The surf is up and there was only one surfer out today. Surfing has become too much of a hassle for me lately, crowds and age the main detractors. With skateboarding, there’s no problem getting up, and there are no crowds. The drawbacks are, yes, pavement and cars (and age, que lástima).

So I’ve been swimming. Jeez, if I lived where water was this warm I’d be in it every day. Tonight I bagged it because of the shorebreak – steep beach means you can get handled coming back in – as I did yesterday, rolled around and thoroughly pounded – sand in hair, ears, coating body, I mean I was sanded!

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From Canada to Mexico by Mule

Bernie Harberts was featured in our book Tiny Homes (pp. 188-89). He traveled from Canada to Mexico for 14 months in a 21-square-foot (floor area) wagon pulled by a mule. Here is a letter we just received from him.

Howdy Lloyd,

Many mule miles, no letters…

You featured mule Polly and her wagon in your Tiny Homes- Simple Shelter book.

That story continues.

What I never really said much about is that I filmed that 14-month voyage across America. That voyage is now the “Lost Sea Expedition” TV series. The site and official trailer are at: https://lostseaexpedition.com

I’ve attached some photos for you. I’d love to share the story and news with your blog readers.

Hell, I know you’re busy. You write you could use a clone. No worries. I’ll write the content for you. Just tell me what would work for you (short article, picture essay, blog post, etc).

Hope you and the hummers are well. You and I have Lived for we know the Jubilation of a thawed hummer flying from our hands!

Keep groovin’

Bernie Harberts

https://lostseaexpedition.com

A Man A Mule America

Both photos from Tiny Homes: Simple Shelter

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