Warmest Tent on Earth – Pitching in the Siberian Arctic Winter

The Nenet reindeer herders need to move their tent every few days throughout most of the year. Every time they migrate they must pack the whole tent away, drag it across the tundra on sledges, and erect it again in a fresh place, sometimes in temperatures of minus thirty degrees. Survival depends on working together as a team.

After staying in the wooded taiga for two months they start to migrate north following the ancient paths of migrating reindeer (caribou). In four months they will travel up to 1200km and must pack and move every three to five days to keep up with their herd. They must reach their summer quarters before the snows melt and flood great rivers with icy waters too cold and deep for the calves, born along the way, to cross.…

Post a comment

Water Tank in West Central Oregon

Shot this photo in August, 2017, on my way up to watch the total eclipse at the home of our friends Lew and Krystal in Prineville, Oregon. The sloping sides of the lower part are typical supports for the heaviness of the water tank at top.

(I’m posting things these days by going through my archives randomly and picking out shots that I think are of interest.)

Post a comment (3 comments)

Large Fishing Boat on California Coast

On Thursday Louie and I, plus our friends Titsch and Pepe, drove up to the Noyo harbor just south of Ft. Bragg to have lunch at Silver’s At The Wharf, which is as good a seafood restaurant as there is anywhere. I not only recommend going there if you are ever in the vicinity of Fort Bragg, but also to check out the little harbor community of restaurants, fishing stores, trailer park, and other real life, non-tourist businesses at the harbor.

It’s a serious fishing port, with fairly hazardous channel lined by boulders out into the ocean. Fishermen along the coast have my utmost respect, especially if they have to get out into the ocean through the waves; not for the fainthearted, for sure. Same thing with farmers: they have to deal with the real world; so different from most other occupations.

This boat caught my eye.

Statistics:
Beam: 26.0 ft
Tonnage: 143 GT / 97 NT
Year of Build: 1982
Builder: Kelley Boat Works, Fort Bragg, CA

Post a comment (1 comment)

Louie’s Shop

When I first met Louie, in the mid-1980s, I was stunned by the beauty of this little building, and even more stunned when he told me that his design was based on the painting of a Mandan earth lodge on page 4 of our book Shelter. Moreover, his cabin across the river was based on the drawing of a small Japanese cabin (bottom right, page 21) in Shelter.

At that point, I had published Shelter II in 1978, but hadn’t really planned on any new books on building.

If Shelter had inspired buildings like this, it occurred to me that it was time for a sequel, and therefore I started working on Home Work, featuring Louie’s creations as the first part of the book. It turned out that a lot of buildings had been inspired by Shelter, as you can see if you leaf through Home Work.*

Since then, we’ve become the best of friends, and I visit him whenever I can. I stay in the little circular room (at right in the exterior photo), and it’s always a wonderful experience — looking up at the radial framing of the roof (with a Ford truck wheel at the apex), looking out at the grapevines, enjoying the design and quality of the building.

I always consult him on projects underway, and on this trip I took along the 30 or so pages of rough layout of our next book, Rolling Homes, and got his feedback.

Now that I’ve returned home, I’m back to work on this book, and it looks really exciting — what with the huge interest in nomadic living these days.*

Stay tuned.

P.S.: I highly recommend the film Nomadland; it’s real (a rarity these days).

*Shameless Commerce Department

You can get both Shelter and Home Work on our website with a 30% discount and free shipping — which beats Amazon. There’s a money back guarantee on all of our books.
www.shelterpub.com

Post a comment (5 comments)

Scottish Highland Cow

There’s a herd of these just south of Tomales (Marin County, Northern California). Wikipedia says this breed: “…‍originated in the Scottish Highlands and the Outer Hebrides islands of Scotland and has long horns and a long shaggy coat. It is a hardy breed, bred to withstand the intemperate conditions in the region.”

Post a comment (3 comments)

Reconstructed Building at Fort Ross, Sonoma County, California

This octagonal wooden structure is one of the beautifully reconstructed buildings at Fort Ross, “…the hub of the southernmost Russian settlements in North America from 1812 to 1841.” See: wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Ross,_California

If you are ever driving north along Highway one towards Mendocino, and are at all interested in building or California history, I highly recommend stopping in at this spectacularly reconstructed fort.

www.fortross.org/reconstruction.htm

Post a comment