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Photos From My Latest Trip, Batch A

Colliding Rivers near Glide, Oregon, where Little River and the North Umpqua River meet head-on. There’s a photo on the bridge where I was standing showing the confluence looking like a maelstrom in the winter, with water up over the bridge (covering all the rocks you see here!). I went swimming a little downriver, it was co-o-ld, but refreshing on a hot day.

Birdhouse at Bellknap Hot Springs, on the Mckenzie River in central Oregon.

Cost $8 for an hour to use the facilities, mainly a large pool with temperature of 95-100F. A lovely place. The temp. of water coming from the springs is about 190F.

I’m trying to contact the guy who makes these, to get a few for our collection of mini houses.

Lew’s super catspaw tool, available online. This one is stainless, about $35. Amazon has a titanium one, about $80, for he who must have everything.

Ricky B, who does antique and vintage car restorations in Prineville, Oregon, has created a miniature ghost town. as shown in these 3 photos.

It’s a uniquely delightful place. Everything Ricky does, both autos and vintage building, is remarkable.

Norman’s Mom “…wouldn’t even harm a fly.”

Ricky has at least 30 cars, all immaculately detailed. Most are standard models, but this is a wicked hot rod, I believe a 1951 Mercury, chopped and channelled to perfection.


On the road southeast, from Burns to Jordan Valley, Oregon

I’m frustrated by having such a dorky layout, due  to Blogger.com parameters. I don’t have the skills (coding) or time to make these posts look other than awkward. So, for a while (until I can get my layouts together), it’ll have to be the singer, not the song…

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Back Home From Oregon, Nevada + the Instagram Factor

Got back at 3 AM Thursday morning, having left Elko 15 hours earlier. Not straight-thru driving, by any means (I dawdle), but a long day nevertheless. A great trip, rich in adventure and new territory. Once again, I have the problem of too much “content.” I could do a small book on each trip, but each time I  return home, I get immersed in the details of running a publishing house, and having to work on a more standard sized book.

For example, I could do some really nice small books on travels to SE Asia, to Scotland, and this latest cruise through California’s two sister states.

My blog is bit of a hodgepodge these days, what with doing Instagram (because of its immediacy and ease), and other time constraints. If you haven’t figured it out, all the posts with the captions written up as headlines are automatic posts from Instagram to the blog. Not elegant, but it’s the best I can do right now.

You can view my Instagram posts at www.instagram.com/lloyd.kahn. This way you can see the videos, which don’t get transferred to the blog.

I’ll put up some photos (I shot about 450, between the iPhone (6S Plus) and Olympus OM-D) from the trip on the next post.

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The Gag-Me-With-A-Spoon Summer of Love

My annoyance at all the lame krap floating around now about 1967 in the Haight-Ashbury district, “The Summer of Love,”just about turned to repulsion of late. Yeah, strong word, but man is it bad! We went to the deYoung Museum in San Francisco (an architectural catastrophe) Friday for their exhibit. $25 entrance fee! Most of the exhibit consisted of posters and yes, the posters were magnificent, but the exhibit was mostly ’60s drivel.

The “hippie clothing” was awful. No elegance, no simplicity. People with bad taste and too much time on their hands; bad colors, mishmashes of design. A truly awful crocheted bedspread commissioned by Bob Weir. Two rooms of flashing video montages of blurry dancers — senseless, dumb; not trippy — sloppy.

And the clincher: when you leave the exhibit, they funnel you into The Summer of Love Gift Shop. I kid you not. T-shirts, hats, trinkets, a poster of lame buttons — all made in China.

These curators are giving the ’60s a bad name.

The “Hippie Modernism” exhibit at the Berkeley Museum was way better.

As is the exhibit at the California Historical Society. Really good b&w photos, tracing the ’60s from the Beats-on. $5 entrance fee.

There was a conference this weekend, some 45 presentations on the era, mostly by college professors.

Sorry, I’ve been brooding over all the distortions, all the weren’t-there, don’t-get-it pontificators.

“The Haight-Ashbury was a neighborhood. The ’60s was a movement.” -Ken Kesey

PS The “Summer of Love” (1967) was in actuality a disaster in San Francisco.

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My Take on the ’60s

Jim Morrison said once that when they (The Doors) finished a record, only then were they released to start thinking about the next one. When I finished Small Homes, I couldn’t think what to do next. I’d sort of run the gamut of 9″x12′ building books, each with about color 1000 photos, from Home Work to Small Homes. Retire? No way! I’m just getting warmed up.

About the same time there was an explosion of articles, TV specials, museum exhibits, and conferences rehashing “The Summer of Love.” (Yes, I know I’ve written this before, but I’m further into it all now.)

Since my take on the years was so different from everything being written or presented, I decided to write my own version of the ’60s. (I was there.) The project seemed to gather momentum as I proceeded. I started having fun. I hadn’t looked back at those times in any sort of organized way, and I found myself not only marveling at what happened, but having new insights with the perspective of 5 decades.

Plus, the 60s weren’t an abstraction for me. The concepts, the spirit, the new knowledge profoundly changed my life. (I just realized this now.)

Stop, children, what’s that sound,

Everybody look—what’s going down.

                             -Buffalo Springfield

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New iMac!

I’ve been struggling with my 9-year-old MacPro for months. Continually hanging up, getting the spinning globe in Mail, Chrome, Photoshop, etc. Rick tried just about everything, but we just couldn’t figure it out. Finally, rather than wait around for the new MacPro, we decided to go with this machine. Oh man, what a delight! Such elegant design, wireless keyboard and mouse, sparkling monitor. Rick’s got it rolling, now tuning up before he takes off for Hawaii.

Just today started working on my book on the ’60s (which is looking more and more like a book) on it.

27-inch iMac with Retina 5K display

With the following configuration:

• 3.4GHz quad-core 7th-generation Intel Core i5, Turbo Boost up to 3.8GHz

• 8GB 2400MHz DDR4

• 512GB SSD • Radeon Pro 570 with 4GB video memory

• Magic Mouse 2

• Magic Keyboard with Numeric Keypad – US English

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IBM Selectric Composer Font

I came across this the other day when cleaning out old files. It’s a font from an IBM Selectric Composer, a $9,000 souped-up IBM Selectric typewriter, which was used for typesetting in the ’60s and ’70s. It was the step in between linotype (hot lead) and the Macintosh. There was a different ball for each typeface, and when you wanted to switch from roman (plain) type to italic, you changed the font. The Composer was used by Stewart Brand for the Whole Earth Catalog and then by us for Shelter and our subsequent books up until the early 90s, when we switched to the MacIntosh.

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A Plethora of Media

I’m in kind of a communications muddle right now.

Background:

• Worked on high school newspaper 1952

• Ran US Air Force base newspaper in Germany 1958-60

• Shelter editor of Whole Earth Catalog 1969-73

• Published Domebook One in 1970, Domebook 2 in 1971

• Published Shelter in 1973

• 1973-present day, published series of various books, mostly on building and fitness

• Interspersed between: a series of magazine articles, pamphlets, brochures, flyers, posters, hand-crafted, hand-lettered scrapbooks (print runs of two (2), panoramic photo collages, a few videos, and stretching software (StretchWare). All extracurricular.

•Started a blog in 2010. Why not? I gave it a whirl and liked it. (Thanks, Eszter!) Some 5,000 posts later, I realized it was taking a lot of time, and no income. I backed off and so did my readers (see graph):

•At that point I started with Instagram. Photo-oriented, whereas my blog was word-oriented. I liked being able to record something (iPhone photo) and get it up there right away. I liked the age group using it. All my Instagram posts automatically go up on my Twitter account and blog, but it’s not a great solution. The formats don’t transfer very well. Hmmm…

So here I am.

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The Truth About Tiny House TV Shows

I’ve been contacted 3-4 times by TV producers regarding tiny homes. Each time I’ve felt that they weren’t searching for the reality of the subject, but trying to shoehorn something into a phony story line. Reality shows are bad enough, but pre-determined phony reality is worse. Here’s a good article on the subject: http://rockymountaintinyhouses.com/the-truth-about-tiny-house-tv-shows/ 

“…The crew shows up to tiny house build in progress. The customers are in over their heads. They need the house finished in two weeks. They need these super cool expensive features in order to meet their needs. Their budget is a completely unattainable, $30,000. Trucks get stuck, storms roll in, vendors miss deliveries, old wood bridges threaten to fall into the river, the house tries to roll off a cliff…Somehow in the end it all comes together and the people are left with their dream tiny house. Folks, this just isn’t how it works.…”

-Greg Parham, Rocky Mountain Tiny Houses

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Victoria & Albert Museum Exhibition – “You Say You Want A Revolution?” – opens Sept. 10, 2016 in London

I got interviewed via Skype (with which I’m not too comfortable, at least doing an intercontinental interview) by the BBC yesterday. A last-minute deal.

The Victoria and Albert Museum has an exhibit opening next week titled:

“You Say You Want a Revolution? Records and Rebels 1966-1970”

“How have the finished and unfinished revolutions of the late 1960s changed the way we live today and think about the future?”

They’ve been working on this a long time; they came to our house with a camera crew about a year ago; then a month or so ago, V&A personnel along with four British reporters interviewed Stewart Brand and me for several hours in San Francisco. What were the 60s like? What role do the Whole Earth Catalog have in the countercultural revolution? Etc.

 Here’s the news program that ran in the UK last night: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p046zwdy

 Here’s info on the exhibit: https://www.vam.ac.uk/exhibitions/you-say-you-want-a-revolution-records-and-rebels-1966-70

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