small homes (118)

French-Canadian Family’s Small Home in Quebec

Sophie and Marc’s home will be in our next book, Small Homes. Here is a letter from them, with a link to a film of their family and home:

Dear Lloyd,

Marc and I were on tv radio-canada last night.

Our family philosophy, construction and lifestyle close to nature—10 min.

https://ici.radio-canada.ca/tele/remue-menage/2016/segments/reportage/8060/vivre-autrement-nature-simplicite?isAutoPlay=1

Have fun watching

Love to you

the quebec family

Sophie Belisle and Marc Boutin

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Maine Builder Specializes in SMALL, not TINY Homes

Jim Bahoosh is a builder in Maine who specializes in small (500-900 sq. ft.) homes. His homes look really nice, and of the right size.

This of course coincides with our next book, now almost completed: Small Homes, which highlights some 70 builders and their small homes (400-1200 sq. ft.). It’s due out in February, 2017.

Article on Jim: https://bangordailynews.com/2016/08/01/homestead/small-but-not-tiny-houses-right-size-for-many/

His website: https://www.jimbahooshbuilder.com/houses.shtml

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Gabrielle Garland Art Exhibit Opens Saturday in Chicago

Gabrielle Garland is a prolific New York-based artist whose main focus right now is on homes and dwelling spaces. Her little homes are whimsical and alive. Here is what The Hughes Gallery in Australia wrote about her:

“…Focusing on areas of human habitation, Garland does not seek to directly depict these spaces, but rather to communicate the ways we experience place. To that end she twists the rules of perspective to better suit the shift in focus and vantage point that occurs when we are in a room or outside a building. Memory is integral to the process. Garland takes photographs to remind her of the experience of a space and when translating them to drawings she combines alternative perspectives from different photographs to create ‘a kind of virtual collage allowing many different systems of order to exist in a single piece.…'”

https://www.rayhughesgallery.com/bio-cv/Gabrielle-Garland

 There is a wonderful body of her work at https://gabriellegarland.org/ and an exhibit opening in Chicago on July 22nd (tomorrow): https://www.corbettvsdempsey.com/2016/06/24/gabrielle-garland-2/

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Progress on SMALL HOMES Book

We just finished what will probably be the middle section of the book, “Small Homes in Cities and Towns,” 67 photos on some 20 pages. When Rick showed me the finished pages, I was thrilled. Some times I’ll muddle my way through a project, starting with no concept of how it will come out, and the whole, as  they say, is greater than the sum of its parts, i.e., synergy.

We’ve got 200 out of 224 pages done now. I have this great feeling, having worked for so many months, because:

1. we’re close to the end (to printers in November, out February 2017)

2. it looks so darned good!

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Small Homes Book Rolling

Workwise, I’m having more fun than in a coon’s age.

This book—Small Homes—was in limbo for the 30 days we were in Scotland. Add to that the several weeks it took to get re-grounded at home, and there was a long lull in production (layout, that is).

WELL! The book is now rolling at a grand pace. This lovely little home just came in a few days ago.  French carpenter Menthé (partner of French carpenter Yogan) wrote, rather poetically:

“I grew up in the forest of Corréze; it’s really wild and green. 

I started building cabins when I was 3 years old, playing in the forest. 

I started this little one when I was 17 in 2000—I wanted my independence. 

It took me 3 years, and I lived there for 2 years.

The frame is made of chestnut from the forest, and all the windows are industrial window seconds.

The roof is insulated with lime and woodchips—a really strong mixture once it’s dry and insects can’t get in.

The walls are made of straw and lime; it’s a really cheap material, important when you’re young without money.

I built the entrance door with chestnut and walnut—my first work of joinerie, and it’s still working good.…”

***

This is gonna be such a good book!

Música del día: Cool Dry Place, Traveling Wilburys: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gD8mBMn5F5k

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Stone Cottage Overlooking Sea On Scottish Island

Everything here is perfect. It’s one of the buildings where I just say to myself, oh yeah!

The rounded, angled-out corners, the  proportions, the deep wall openings, the red roof.

According to an historical account which I read, some 14 farm families were forced to leave their land by landlords in the mid-1800s, and resettled on a more remote and less fertile part of the island. This is one of the dwellings; in its day, it would have had a thatched roof.

And with this I conclude posts from Scotland. I’m back in the saddle at home and back at work on Small Homes.

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Friday Morning Fish Fry*

*So titled after San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen’s Friday columns, called “Friday Fish Fry;” Herb was master of 3-dot stories…

Water It’s raining this morning,

Praise the Universe.

We’re up to 28″ this year, more or less normal. Our well is working again. We’ve installed a 5000-gallon storage tank which collects water off neighbors’ roof. The California hills are an almost chartreuse green. Creeks are running.

Scotland Ho! We’re off

There is a festival of architecture in Scotland now, sponsored by the Fife Contemporary Arts Center. It’s called “Shelters,” and features an entire room exhibiting our work, with photo and page blowups, and our building books. It’s open now at the Kircaldy Galleries (about 12 miles north of Edinburgh), on the east coast of Scotland) and runs through June 5, 2016.

I’ll be doing a slide show presentation on May 10th, at Kircaldy Galleries, titled “50 Years of Natural Building,” chronicling our building books from Shelter in 1973 up to the present.

We’re leaving Tuesday via Virgin Atlantic. On Saturday, we’re taking a ferry to the tiny island of Eigg.

“Eigg (/ɛɡ/; Scottish Gaelic: Eige, [ˈekʲə] ( listen)) is one of the Small Isles, in the Scottish Inner Hebrides. It lies to the south of the Skye and to the north of the Ardnamurchan peninsula. Eigg is 9 kilometres (5.6 mi) long from north to south, and 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) east to west. With an area of 12 square miles (31 km2), it is the second largest of the Small Isles after Rùm.

Notably, Eigg generates virtually 100% of its electricity using renewable energy.…” -Wikipedia

Our hosts have arranged for us to spend a week in “Sweeney’s Bothy,” a tiny home looking down to the sea. Am I excited!

There are about 80 people on the island, there are kayak and mountain bike rentals, sheep, there are a couple of restaurants, the Whale’s Head Community Pub, and I am sure, plenty of kindred spirits. Yes!

I’ll be Instagraming and blogging, so stay tuned and ride shotgun with us during the month of May.

Social Media I’m doing less blogging and more Instagraming these days. Less writing, more photos. I like the immediacy of Instagram, still learning the techniques (don’t like the square format), trying to figure out how to use hash tags and get more followers…Check out our new Tumblr presentation of large beautiful photos: https://shelterpub.tumblr.com and https://shelterpub.tumblr.com/archive, set up by Sean Hellfritsch and now managed by Brittany Cole Bush…Check out The Shelter Blog, https://www.theshelterblog.com/, managed by Evan Kahn, and improving daily, with an ever-increasing flow of original material…we continue working on the digital side of our communications…while producing real life hold-in-yr-hands books…

Small Homes, the book We are 3/4 through with layout…about 154 pages so far and counting…Rick will be doing Photoshop work while I’m gone and then we’ll hit it again in June…this is shaping up to be a great book, I kid you not. You can see some sneak previews at: https://www.theshelterblog.com/?s=sneak+preview 

A gude beginning maks a gude ending. (Scottish proverb)

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