small homes (113)

Which Cover Do You Like Best?

Rick and I are in the final stages of preparing Small Homes for the printers. We changed the cover from an earlier version, which showed a small turn-of-the-century home in Santa Cruz (in this revised cover, it’s the middle image in the left hand column), because a single image didn’t seem to represent the diversity of images (120 or so small homes) in the book. Hence the collage.

Below are two alternatives, the same except for the background color. In the one with the red, it’s similar-looking to Home Work, Builders of the Pacific Coast, and Tiny Homes on the Move. Some of our savvy book friends think it’s too similar, and that another color would distinguish it from the other books. Hence the other with the dark green background.

Comments, please. Which do you like? Do you see any problem in this cover being similar to our other books?

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Layout of Pages on Last Home in Our Book SMALL HOMES


Just did layout of the last home in our next book, Small Homes: The Right Size. It’s a 2-family home converted to a duplex in San Francisco,. Downstairs is Jay Nelson, his wife Rachel Kaye, and their daughter Romy; upstairs is Dalia Burde — all 3 are artists (probably Romy (above) too).

This is what’s called a “tenants in common” agreement, where 2 parties buy a home together. Listen up, people looking for homes in cities, here’s a way to cut costs in half with the important prerequisite that you’re compatible (and remain so) with each other.

At left: staircase between the 2 units, in the backyard.

We’ve got another month or so to go on the book. I’ve been neglecting a bunch of things, like working out, blogging, traveling—to get it done. Boy, do I want to get it done!

Next we’re working on the “front matter” and “back matter,” as well as the all-important, the big kahuna—the cover. We’re probably changing from a single home on the cover to a collage of 14 photos. I’m going to put up our cover choices here for general feedback pretty soon.

Listening to this song just now: Marty Raybon – There’s A Ghost In This House now:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=St1-_JQwido

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Natural Building Colloquium – High Desert, Southern California Oct. 17th-22nd, 2016

“Focusing on the West Coast and South West

Quail Springs is an educational and land stewardship nonprofit organization dedicated to demonstrating and teaching holistic ways of designing human environments, restoring and revitalizing the land and community, and facilitating deeper understandings of ourselves and one another through immersive experiences in nature. The 2016 Colloquium organizing team consists of the whole Quail Springs team, Sasha Rabin*, Tammy Van, and Rebekah Hacker.”

“The gathering will give focus and priority to the building and builders of the west coast and south west, US.
​ We ask that all people attending the colloquium have some experience with natural building. This is not the event for the novice builder. That being said, we value the fresh eyes and perspectives, and enthusiasm that comes with a newness to the field. We will strive for a balance of experienced attendees, while also encouraging the next generation of builders.…”

https://www.earthenshelter.com/colloquium.html

*Sasha’s beautiful cob house will be in Small Homes.

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It’s All About Building

Small Homes – the book

I’ve got pretty much all the pages laid out. Rick will be back from Hawaii next week and build the rest of the pages in InDesign. The book is looking better each week. Here’s a little hidden waterfront cottage (under construction) on Vancouver Island, BC (the shakes for the eaves were steamed and bent).

Material continues to come in for the book (400-1200 sq. ft. homes), and we’ll continue the book after its publication on theshelterblog, with a section titled “Small Homes.” Ongoing small homes.

My Next Book (?)

Adventures in Building – a 70-Year Odyssey

No kidding. I started at 12 years old, helping my dad build a house on his rice farm near Colusa, California. At 18 I got into the carpenters’ union in San Francisco and worked for a shipwright on the docks (SF was a port in those days!). At age 25 I started building and remodeling on a piece of land with 3 cottages in Mill Valley, California.

I never got the chance to work with a master carpenter or formally learn architecture, so I had a layman’s approach. Everything was new.

Right off, I liked the smell of lumber, and was fascinated with how things went together (still am). In about 12 buildings over the course of years, I personally went through post and beam, then polyhedral (domes), and finally stud frame construction techniques.

And all along, I shot pictures of buildings, collected books, and interviewed builders about all types of buildings and materials, and so far, have produced 6 highly graphic books on building.

Having this layman’s view means I can talk to inexperienced builders in understandable terms. Plus, all the travel and studying and interviews have given me a wealth of material of interest to experienced builders. We’re all interested in how things are put together. That’s what building is all about.

Música del día:

Etta James “Come Back Baby”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdFcg7zkhqM

Enough! I’m heading for the beach…

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French-Canadian Family’s Small Home in Quebec

Sophie and Marc’s home will be in our next book, Small Homes. Here is a letter from them, with a link to a film of their family and home:

Dear Lloyd,

Marc and I were on tv radio-canada last night.

Our family philosophy, construction and lifestyle close to nature—10 min.

https://ici.radio-canada.ca/tele/remue-menage/2016/segments/reportage/8060/vivre-autrement-nature-simplicite?isAutoPlay=1

Have fun watching

Love to you

the quebec family

Sophie Belisle and Marc Boutin

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Maine Builder Specializes in SMALL, not TINY Homes

Jim Bahoosh is a builder in Maine who specializes in small (500-900 sq. ft.) homes. His homes look really nice, and of the right size.

This of course coincides with our next book, now almost completed: Small Homes, which highlights some 70 builders and their small homes (400-1200 sq. ft.). It’s due out in February, 2017.

Article on Jim: https://bangordailynews.com/2016/08/01/homestead/small-but-not-tiny-houses-right-size-for-many/

His website: https://www.jimbahooshbuilder.com/houses.shtml

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Gabrielle Garland Art Exhibit Opens Saturday in Chicago

Gabrielle Garland is a prolific New York-based artist whose main focus right now is on homes and dwelling spaces. Her little homes are whimsical and alive. Here is what The Hughes Gallery in Australia wrote about her:

“…Focusing on areas of human habitation, Garland does not seek to directly depict these spaces, but rather to communicate the ways we experience place. To that end she twists the rules of perspective to better suit the shift in focus and vantage point that occurs when we are in a room or outside a building. Memory is integral to the process. Garland takes photographs to remind her of the experience of a space and when translating them to drawings she combines alternative perspectives from different photographs to create ‘a kind of virtual collage allowing many different systems of order to exist in a single piece.…'”

https://www.rayhughesgallery.com/bio-cv/Gabrielle-Garland

 There is a wonderful body of her work at https://gabriellegarland.org/ and an exhibit opening in Chicago on July 22nd (tomorrow): https://www.corbettvsdempsey.com/2016/06/24/gabrielle-garland-2/

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Progress on SMALL HOMES Book

We just finished what will probably be the middle section of the book, “Small Homes in Cities and Towns,” 67 photos on some 20 pages. When Rick showed me the finished pages, I was thrilled. Some times I’ll muddle my way through a project, starting with no concept of how it will come out, and the whole, as  they say, is greater than the sum of its parts, i.e., synergy.

We’ve got 200 out of 224 pages done now. I have this great feeling, having worked for so many months, because:

1. we’re close to the end (to printers in November, out February 2017)

2. it looks so darned good!

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