skateboarding (86)

Check out Photo-Collage of My Week in Baja

Boy am I havin fun! It’s been a perfect week down here. In the water at 7:30 this morning, a shower and now latte and raisin roll and good wi-fi. I wish I had more time to do stuff like this. Idea! I’ll make a little short-run book of the trip. Where’s my clone, anyway?

It’s so easy down here now, and it was so hard 20-30 years ago. My great little Baja bug was under water twice, I had a sketchy relationship with the cunning landlord of the palapa I rented (for $1,000 a year), the place was destroyed in a hurricane of Nov 4 cuatro de Noviembre in the ’90s, and on…

Now there’s a smoothly paved road 12 mi. out to Shipwrecks. Funny, there don’t seem to be many people around at all. Part of that being wealthy people buying (or building) trophy houses that they rarely visit. Summer’s the south-swell surfing season down here and Nov-Dec-Jan are prime times for people fleeing cold climes, but March seems perfect, it’s really comfortable, cool at night and April winds haven’t started. Surprisingly, I found nno mention of the surf online. There’s nothing like checking out the surf in person.

 I still love San José del Cabo. Wandering around the quiet streets. Last night at dusk, Chilón and I walked down to the palm grove by the San José river; it was—the perfect Spanish word—tranquillo. Tortillas de nopales in a little roadside shack, with la cocinera patting out fresh tortillas…

My Instagram on the web this morning came out like a poster for the past few days:

https://www.instagram.com/lloyd.kahn/?hl=es

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Boosted #motorskateboard at Wise Surf Shop, San Francisco

Bob Wise said, “Try it out.” I hesitated, not having been on a skateboard for 3+ months. “Come on,” he said, and we went outside. He showed me how to use the handheld wireless throttle, and it was remarkable. I’m gonna go back and suit up and take it for a longer ride. Fun! No intention of buying one ($1500), but Wise seems to be OK with me taking a cruise. It’s got forward/backward controls, you use the latter for braking. It’ll go uphill. I now have an arm brace for my recently fractured wrist, slowly working my way back into skating. A lot more careful from here on out.

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Did I say I was going to give up skateboarding? Well…

You never miss the hand until the wrist is broke…

I was in a state of pain, shock, depression and self-castigation when I decided to quit:

https://www.lloydkahn.com/2015/12/07/the-day-i-gave-up-skateboarding/

Update: I’ll take 6 months or more to get the wrist break well healed, then devise some kind of right arm brace AND quit the stupid stuff, of which I did a lot. All my skating injuries have been while dicking around sans safety equipment.

I’ve got a state-of-art lightweight strong fiberglass cast, it’s healing beautifully, am making and taking bone broth, calcium citrate, vitamin D3, and eating prunes (said to promote bone strength). Now out of a 2-week deep depression and feelin purty good. You can really appreciate the highs after abject lows. Whoo!

The human body is magnificent in so many ways. I mean bones (properly aligned) grow back together. We, the managers of those bones, set things up as well as we can, then just sit back and watch while the body knits itself back together. Milagro!

I’ll probably skate 80% less but hell, I ain’t giving it up. It’s too god damn much fun! I’ve long planned to get pics skating on my 90th and 100th birthdays. I’m just gonna be a lot more careful.

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The Day I Gave Up Skateboarding (Yesterday)

Busted! Compound fracture of my wrist, that is. It happened just when skating was going so good. A great new board, a downhill section in town closed to traffic for a few weeks, my continued obsession with the sheer fun of skating. But in the back of my mind, I promised myself to quit if I ever had a serious crash. It wasn’t at high speed or anything, it was just goofing around on the street in San Francisco and suddenly the board shot out from under me and I fell back and instinctively blocked the fall with my arm. I just about fainted when I  looked at my wrist; it might be the single most worst moment in my life.

I drove to Marin General Hospital in kind of a daze, shifting with my left hand, and they were incredible. I lucked out in getting a wonderful surgeon. I walked into the hospital in such a mess, and walked out about 24 hours later with everything put back together.

I’ve got two plates and pins in my wrist and it will heal up fine, but if I were to continue skating and damaged that arm again, who knows what could happen. I’m fond of my right hand.

Am I mature or what?

(This is being written by me speaking into a microphone with MacSpeech Dictate, which by the way, is a wonderful alternative to keyboarding.)

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Foster Huntington’s Treehouse (#4)

I’m just starting to work my next book, Small Homes, and still swamped catching up with all the notes I made to my recent trips to NYC and Oregon. My problem right now is too much “content.”

An example is Foster Huntington’s quite incredible compound built on a knoll in the Columbia River Gorge, about 45 minutes northeast of Portland. I wish I had time to do a feature article on this treehouse/skate park/hot tub complex that has a 360° view, which includes the (white) tip of Mount Hood and the Multnomah Falls (500+ feet tall)—I’ll get around to it eventually.

In coming days I’ll put up photos from my visit with Foster. If you’re interested, here are a couple of links to Foster’s latest projects, a film on Vimeo chronicling the months of treehouse construction, as well as his KickStarter campaign for a book on the same subject, which has already generated (ulp!) $58,000 (his goal was $30,0000).

https://vimeo.com/129335481

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/fosterhuntington/the-cinder-cone-build-book

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Notes From Trip Last Week To NYC

(While waiting at the SF airport for a flight to Oregon.)

3 really good places to eat:

-Cookshop, 156 10th Ave (at 26th St.)

-Rosie’s (Mexican), 29 E. 2nd

-Saigon Shack, 114 Macdougal

Great brewpub: Cooper’s 8th Ave. between 18th and 19th

On Monday night I was at W. 4th and W. 11th and it was surprisingly quiet.

“Cheers” in Irish is “”Slainte,” pronounced “schlancha.”

China had a huge presence at Book Expo America. Over 500 people, and their extensive stand seemed to take up 20% of all the space in the hall. They had ongoing, well-attended author appearances.

Good, inexpensive classical Chinese massage, China Tai Ji, 57 W. 8th St, betw. 5th & 6th Aves. Great way to loosen up after a flight.

Citymapper is a free phone app for NYC (and other select cities). You punch in where you want to go, and it gives you directions for walking or public transport, as well as Uber rates. For subways, iTrans NYC is good and costs a few dollars.

Eric Leemon, a TV producer living in the West Village says that NewYorkers are friendly and I agree. Spaces in restaurants and bars are so tight that you sit very close to others and it’s easy to get into conversations. Everyone is helpful if you need directions. Good vibes my whole week there.


The East River Ferry is a great way to get to Williamsburg, Greenpoint, and other neighborhoods in Brooklyn. Terminal at East 34th Street on the river. Sure beats the subway on a hot day.

One bartender to another at Cookshop: “I mean, he was off. I don’t know what he was on to be so off.”

When I get to Portland, first stop will be Stumptown Roastery, then Mt. Tabor to skate. Then I’ll head out to the coast.

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