nature (175)

UK National Trust Seeking Ranger For Remote Island

Anonymous has left a new comment on your post “#shelterpublications world headquarters. #publishi…“:

Might interest one of your adventuring readers:

https://www.charitytoday.co.uk/national-trusts-new-farne-islands-ranger/

Could you be the National Trust’s new Farne Islands ranger?

Fed up with the rat race? With no running water and thousands of puffins as your only neighbours, a new National Trust vacancy promises the ultimate escape.

it’s a wildlife enthusiast’s dream – promising jaw-dropping sunrises, a one minute commute and one of England’s largest seal colonies on your doorstep.

This job isn’t the normal 9 to 5. Being good with PowerPoint isn’t a priority.

“We’re looking for someone with a passion for wildlife and conservation – and who wants to share that passion with others.

Applications for the position of ranger close on 7 February, 2017. To apply visit:

https://careers.nationaltrust.org.uk/OA_HTML/a/#/vacancy-detail/46353.

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Red-Shouldered Hawk in Tree This Morning

It was giving the evil eye to the chickens. (They’re safely enclosed by aviary wire.)

I think this is a young hawk. I climbed up a ladder with my telephoto lens, was maybe 10′ away from him — he wasn’t alarmed. Come to think of it, maybe predators are more in attack than flight mode.

Last night I saw 2 different coyotes on the highway. One is there pretty much all the time; I hope it’s not due to people feeding him.

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Bernie Harberts and His Lost Sea Expedition Series

Bernie Harberts and his mule Polly were featured in the “On the Road” section of our book Tiny Homes.

“I’ve sailed alone around the world, traveled across America by mule (twice), pedaled a ten dollar bike around Tasmania and walked across Newfoundland with a mule. Most recently, I sailed a wood ketch from the Falkland Islands to South Georgia Island, off Antarctica. From there, we sailed 3 weeks across the iceberg laced Southern Ocean to South Africa.…

For the Lost Sea Expedition series, I traveled 14 months across America in a wagon. Just as I did in North Carolina, I explored things that are particular to an area. This time around, it was horse breakers, Lakota elders, sod hut dwellers, ghost towns and a vanished sea that caught my eye.

I filmed the whole voyage myself – a first ever for a cross-country wagon voyage.…”

lostseaexpedition.com/

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Miracle in the Garden This Morning

Lesley’s been watching the chrysalis every day. She just came in to tell me it had emerged when I was on an important phone call so I handed Evan my iPhone and he shot the pic. Note the shell of the chrysalis at right; how did the butterfly ever fit in that small enclosure? Stunning, and it’s the kind of thing that’s going on in the natural world every moment. As Leonard Cohen says, halleluja!

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Red sky at night, sailor’s delight. Red sky in morning, sailor’s warning…

I finally looked it up.

Usually, weather moves from west to east. In the mid-latitudes, the prevailing winds are westerlies. This means storm systems generally move in from the West.…

Red sky at night, sailors delight When we see a red sky at night, this means that the setting sun is sending its light through a high concentration of dust particles. This usually indicates high pressure and stable air coming in from the west. Basically good weather will follow.

Red sky in morning, sailor’s warning A red sunrise can mean that a high pressure system (good weather) has already passed, thus indicating that a storm system (low pressure) may be moving to the east. A morning sky that is a deep, fiery red can indicate that there is high water content in the atmosphere. So, rain could be on its way.…

In the Bible, (Matthew XVI: 2-3,) Jesus said, ‘When in evening, ye say, it will be fair weather: For the sky is red. And in the morning, it will be foul weather today; for the sky is red and lowering.’”

https://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/mysteries/weather-sailor.html

Another source: https://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2009/09/14/q-a-sailors-delight-fact-or-fi/

Photo from: https://simple-pleasures.org/2013/09/05/red-sky-orange-sky/

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First-hand Account of Global Warming in South Seas

My longtime good friend Sam Rehnborg and his wife Francesca took off this summer on their 70-foot sailboat for the South Seas, retracing a voyage they made over 30 years ago. They got some rude shocks from the effects of global warming, as he explained in an e-mail to me last week:

“Bottom line for me is that it was a great experience retracing my steps through this part of the world.  It only reinforces what I sort of knew anyway about the ocean temperature, which has been averaging up here about 88 degrees F.  The fish have disappeared.  The corals are bleaching and dying.

 The water is getting acidified.  The local people are doing the best that they can, but there is not much they can do about some of these big, big changes that are taking place.  The efforts are going to have to take place on a much larger scale.”

The photo shows him sailing out from the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco this July, heading for The Marquesas Islands. His blog on the trip: www.drsamsblog.com

Sam has a Ph.D. in Biophysics and a B.Sc. in Chemical Engineering and is the president of the Nutrilite Health Institute, makers of vitamins and dietary supplements. He just got back and is motivated to do research on global warming.

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