vintage (56)

Website for Native American Photos, Jewelry, Crafts

Bakeitzogie (The Yellow Coyote) – Chiricahua Apache

This is a phenomenal source on Native Americans, with hundreds of archival photos, most of which I have not seen before.

Native Americans

First People is a child friendly site about Native Americans and members of the First Nations. 1400+ legends, 400+ agreements and treaties, 10,000+ pictures, clipart, Native American Books, Posters, Seed Bead Earrings, Native American Jewelry, Possible Bags and more.

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Wells Fargo Stagecoach

This is in the Wells Fargo headquarters in downtown San Francisco.

Wells Fargo began in San Francisco during the gold rush. It acted as a bank and delivery service for miners looking to strike literal gold.

It cost quite a lot of money to transport goods before railroads. In 1867, it would have cost $300 — $7,352 in 2015 dollars — to ride the stagecoach from Sacramento to Omaha, according to an advertisement from the era.

Wells Fargo was able to transfer money and goods quickly and reliably using the stagecoaches. The bank claims that its coaches were made using only the finest materials of the time.

The main builder of these stagecoaches, Abbot & Downing Co., hand assembled the coaches from a variety of woods and rimmed the wheels with iron. It created a suspension system of leather to make the ride more comfortable for passengers crossing deserts and mountains.…

When workers were done with the stagecoaches, they would weigh 2,500 pounds, about as much as a 2016 Toyota Prius C.

The stagecoaches covered 3,000 miles from the West Coast to Nebraska. Once railroads spanning the width of the country were introduced in 1869, stagecoaches began falling out of fashion. They continued serving areas not reachable by rail after that, and Wells Fargo spun off its delivery company in 1905.…

From www.businessinsider.com/…

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Fort Point, Under the Golden Gate Bridge

Note: Click on this image to get a much larger pic.

I often go under the bridge to check the waves. On Friday, they were hitting the seawall, with spray flying. I started talking to a park ranger, and he  told me to go inside the fort, and up to the top (four stories, cast iron staircases).

I grew up in San Francisco, I’ve been down there dozens of times, and I never knew you could go inside the fort. It’s an amazing building, built in 1853-1861. It’s open Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and well worth a visit. I’ll post more photos in coming days. This was a thrill.

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From “Modern Times,” a B&W masterpiece by Charlie Chaplin.

Paulette Goddard, Charlie’s beautiful waif girlfriend has found them a house. “It’s not Buckingham Palace,” she says. Charlie walks in and a beam falls on his head.

One of the funniest movies of all time. It’s a silent film, but made when sound was available. Charlie apparently felt that the Little Tramp wouldn’t work with sound, so this is silent. In the end the Little Tramp and Paulette walk off into the sunset, and this was the end of this character.

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Basque Shepherd’s Trailer

I went to the 65th (!) reunion of my class of 1952, Lowell High School, San Francisco, on Friday. About 80 people out of a class of 250 attended. Even though I’ve taken a different direction (wealth, politics) than most of them, I still love seeing these friends of 70+ years.

It was held at the Basque Cultural Center in South San Francisco, and this wagon was parked out in front. The curved roof, with bed at one end is, I believe, an excellent configuration for a tiny home, far better than the poster boy for tiny homes, the steep gable roof with ladder to loft for sleeping — a bad design, in my opinion, for many reasons. Here you can have drawers under the bed, and the curved roof gives you a feeling of spaciousness, as opposed to the claustrophobia of many tiny home designs.

This is also the basic design for the vardo of the Roma people in Europe.

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Isetta 300

This is a 1-cylinder Italian microcar built by BMW that got 94 miles per gallon in the ’50s. There were a lot of them in Germany when I was stationed there in the USAF in the late ’50s. This one was being refurbished by Ricky J in Prineville, Oregon, when I was there for the eclipse last month. Ricky has a fleet of old cars that he’s restoring, each one a gem by the time he’s through..

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Photos From My Latest Trip, Batch A

Colliding Rivers near Glide, Oregon, where Little River and the North Umpqua River meet head-on. There’s a photo on the bridge where I was standing showing the confluence looking like a maelstrom in the winter, with water up over the bridge (covering all the rocks you see here!). I went swimming a little downriver, it was co-o-ld, but refreshing on a hot day.

Birdhouse at Bellknap Hot Springs, on the Mckenzie River in central Oregon.

Cost $8 for an hour to use the facilities, mainly a large pool with temperature of 95-100F. A lovely place. The temp. of water coming from the springs is about 190F.

I’m trying to contact the guy who makes these, to get a few for our collection of mini houses.

Lew’s super catspaw tool, available online. This one is stainless, about $35. Amazon has a titanium one, about $80, for he who must have everything.

Ricky B, who does antique and vintage car restorations in Prineville, Oregon, has created a miniature ghost town. as shown in these 3 photos.

It’s a uniquely delightful place. Everything Ricky does, both autos and vintage building, is remarkable.

Norman’s Mom “…wouldn’t even harm a fly.”

Ricky has at least 30 cars, all immaculately detailed. Most are standard models, but this is a wicked hot rod, I believe a 1951 Mercury, chopped and channelled to perfection.


On the road southeast, from Burns to Jordan Valley, Oregon

I’m frustrated by having such a dorky layout, due  to Blogger.com parameters. I don’t have the skills (coding) or time to make these posts look other than awkward. So, for a while (until I can get my layouts together), it’ll have to be the singer, not the song…

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