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Kevin Kelly Speaking About His New Book “The Inevitable” in San Francisco July 14th

“We’re at just the beginning of the beginning of the digital world for humanity, says Kevin Kelly.  But some deep trends have already emerged that can reliably be conjured with and braced for.  Kelly calls them inevitable.

The internet was inevitable, he says, but Wikipedia was not.  Smart phones were inevitable, the iPhone not.  The twelve deepest trends he labels: Becoming; Cognifying; Flowing; Screening; Accessing; Sharing; Filtering; Remixing; Interacting; Tracking; Questioning; and Beginning.

Kevin Kelly is the author of Out of Control, New Rules for the New Economy, Cool Tools, What Technology Wants, and now, The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future.  He is one of the founding board members of The Long Now Foundation.…”

-Stewart Brand

“The Next 30 Digital Years,” Kevin Kelly, the Herbst Theater, Civic Center, San Francisco, 7pm, Thursday July 14.  The show starts promptly at 7:30pm.

https://longnow.org/seminars/02016/jul/14/next-30-digital-years/

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Stretching at Your Computer

Our software StretchWare is now free. StretchWare is the ergonomic software that reminds you to stretch, developed by Bob Anderson, author of our book, Stretching.

It’s a great program; every hour or two hours, or certain number of keystrokes, a Tibetan bell rings and a window pops up asking if you have time to stretch. If you do, you click okay, and the stretches pop up on the screen. When you roll your mouse over an individual stretch, instructions pop up in a window.

It works on both Mac and Windows computers. Go here to download:

https://www.shelterpub.com/stretchware/

BTW, we were kind of amazed to learn this week that our book Stretching sold 38,000 copies in China last year.

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New York Times Articles on New iPhones, iPads

Today’s edition (10 Sept. 2015)  has two full pages in the business section on the new IPads, iPhones and other things Apple. For one thing there is a list of what sound like killer apps for iPhone panoramas. Tech columnist Farhad Manjoo says that the iPhone is “… directly a product of the savvy way Apple has designed and marketed the device to produce global lust.”

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Less Blog Posts These Days

To tell the truth, it’s a great relief, not feeling the pressure of getting out a post every day. Almost 5,000 of ’em — time for a change

My main focus these days is on the new book, SMALL HOMES; I’ve got over 50 pages roughly laid out, am in daily contact with a slew of contributors. I figure making books is how I can reach the most people, the best use of my time right now.

We’re plotting a new online strategy. Right now, I’m thinking of doingTwitter and Instagram, with occasional blog posts. Right now there are 5 steps to getting a photo out there:

1. Shoot photo.

2. Load into MacAir.

3. Fiddle a bit with it in Photoshop.

4. Find Wi-Fi (or be in office)

5. Post it

My intention is to shoot photos with an iPhone 6, post on Instagram right then. If this works out, I’ll be able to communicate way quicker. Right now, am waiting to see what Apple’s got coming with the iPhone 7, maybe the 6’s will be cheaper.

Found a nearly deserted beach yesterday, clothes off, warm sand, swimming, the only time I’ve experienced NorCal water so warm was the last El Niño, so unusual to be in this ocean and feel comfortable. Gathered a big bag full of purple/green seaweed for the garden. Like my neighbor, surfer/fisherman Andrew said the other day (down at the beach), “We’re so lucky.”

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The More Probable Continuation of This Blog

When I wrote about ending this blog 2 days ago, I was in what you might call a state of mild confused desperation. These (warm summer) days, I’m:

• (joyfully) working on a new book

• trying to figure out how to get more of our books out in bookstores (where people can see them, and pick them up…)

• revamping our digital communications

• shuffling a ton of other things I want to do right now. 

Life is rich.

Thank you guys for the comments. I mean, really! Stephanie gets it. I love ya too, Stephanie. So good to hear I’m connecting.

With the process of iteration, here’s where I’m at this morning:

I’ll keep the blog going. Thanks, George, Rick, Sharkey, etc.

I won’t keep trying to do a post a day. Too stressful, and causing me to sometimes put up less-than-great stuff just to fill in daily gaps. I’ll do a lot less posting stuff from other websites, but put up original material, stuff I’ve done or witnessed, photos new to the internet world. If you were checking it daily, now check it weekly.

Blogs aren’t going to be eliminated by social media, any more than radio was eliminated by TV, or TV eliminated by the internet. They all have their function.

Other digital stuff In discussions yesterday with my two 30-something-year-old consultants, Sean Hellfritsch and my son Evan, we roughed out a plan: I’m going to do Instagram posts from an iPhone 6 (mostly when I’m out and around in the world). I’ll also start tweeting again (fun!). We’ll figure out how to coordinate our extensive home/shelter/building content on my blog, theshelterblog, Instagram, Tumbl’r, Twitter, linking back and forth. Facebook too. Sean’s going to come up with a plan, Evan’s going to do much of the posting. We’ll get the plan together when Rick and Lew are back.

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The Very Possible End of this Blog

In the ’60s I had a friend is Santa Barbara, a highly-skilled gardener, tell me this about the growth of his pot plants: they’d not grow much for a week or so, then suddenly in 24 hours they’d grow like crazy. We talked about how knowledge was like that. You’ll take in information and ponder something over a period of time and suddenly—eureka!—you’ll get it. You get the whole picture. You see the way forward.

Well here’s my growth spurt of the last few days. It may be premature to write this, but I think I see a new way to get out our “content*”) out to (more) people.

I’ve been pondering mostly Instagram and Twitter, but also Facebook (ugh!), Pinterest, maybe Tumblr as a better way than blogging. I’ve done almost 5,000 posts now, some 7 million page views, I think it’s time to hang it up, or at least quit trying to do a post a day. I’ve been running it like a mini-newspaper, and I love doing it, but it’s taking too much time. Maybe I’ll just do my own material on this blog and not keep posting interesting stuff from other websites.

Small Homes

I’m laying out about 2 pages of this new book each day. Once I get the photos and text on the design table, it seems to assemble itself. Oh this fits here…I’ll put the pull quote here…Line this up both up and across…I love doing it—watching the birth of a book. A lot of material came in today—photos and stories.

I need to put more time into the book now, less on the blog.

Plus it’s occurring to me that blogs may be less significant these days, what with these super-sized phone screens and the fact that people are checking Instagram and Facebook daily whereas one has to go to a blog. I only look at blogs occasionally.

Lloyd’s Change of Direction

The iPhone 6 Plus! Holy shit! What a tool. I’ve run across 3 of them in the last 5 days. Yesterday my friend Jeff said, “Have you seen the billboards with photos shot on the iPhone 6?” I’ve kept saying I’d rather shoot quick photos with my many-featured Sony Cybershot RX100 II—raw files, tons of options not on any phone. But the camera seems v. good on the new iPhone and it’ll allow me to post stuff immediately, without having to shoot pix, load them on computer, use wi-fi, blah blah blah…Just zap from the phone. Immediate communication.

It’s gonna be fun, because I run across so much interesting stuff out in the world.

Looking forward to doing Twitter again. Forced to edit self.

*I have probably 15,000 (film and digital ) photos from 50+years—maybe half of them on homes, builders, building, architecture, most of it never used.

Live Broadcast of Small Homes

We’re going to try publishing excerpts from this book as we lay it out. Need to figure how to do so efficiently…hey, what about publishing quick photos of rough layout like this, along with a paragraph about the builder/homeowners? Would that work? The above layout:

“Jes Nelee’, musician and world traveler, designed and built her own small home in Tulsa, Oklahoma, with the help of her 80-year-old grandfather and friends.”

We could do that real simply. Get out on theshelterblog plus other social media.

Just sayin…

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