Poured Concrete Bridge by Dave Sellers

Dave Sellers is an architect in Vermont who has worked on a variety of fascinating projects during his career. One of his passions is concrete and he is currently finishing a poured concrete home. Here is a bridge he and friends recently built in Vermont. 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_E._Sellers

2 Responses to Poured Concrete Bridge by Dave Sellers

  1. Maui Surfer says:

    Are you into Maillard?
    https://i.pinimg.com/564x/bf/19/00/bf190001956ef30f1f6ced6bbf542e9f.jpg
    Back in late 1950’s I studied history of architecture with Vincent Skully, and he introduced me to Robert Maillard’s work.
    more here
    https://www.pinterest.com/acsarchitect/robert-maillart-bridge-engineer-poet-of-structure/?lp=true

  2. Maui Surfer says:

    Robert Maillart learned the analytical methods of his era, but he was most influenced by the principles developed by his mentor, Wilhelm Ritter, mentioned above. Maillart studied under Ritter, who had three basic principles of design. The first of these was to value calculations based on simple analysis, so that appropriate assumptions could be made based on common sense. The second was to consider carefully the construction process of the structure, not just the final product. The last principle was to test a structure always with full-scale load tests. All these principles are an adaptation of the available techniques, but with an emphasis on the careful study of previously built structures.

    At the time of Maillart and Ritter, other designers preferred that their designs evolve from previously successful structures and designs. German engineers and scientists had developed elaborate mathematical techniques, and were confident that they did not need practical load tests of their designs developed using those techniques. However, these techniques did not encourage designers to think of unusual shapes, because those shapes could not be completely analyzed using the available mathematical techniques. Ritter’s principles did allow for uncommon shapes.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Maillart

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