Attention Car Nuts: 1930s Cord (810/812),1939 Studebaker Pickup Truck

A week ago, while in Vancouver, I went to have dinner with my friend, Vic Marks. Vic is the publisher of Hartley and Marks, and I got to know him years ago because of his elegant book Japanese Joinery: A Handbook for Joiners and Carpenters, published in 1983. Since then, Vick has developed a line of journals, or “blank books,” called Paperblanks, with beautiful covers, and it’s hugely successful.

Vic lives on a farm south of Vancouver and I got there as the sun was starting to set. Lo and behold, he’s a car collector, and here are two of his vehicles. I’d seen pictures of Cords, but never one close up, and it was a beauty. In 70 years, I don’t think there’s been a more beautiful car designed.


 I don’t ever remember seeing a Studebaker pickup truck; look at the angle of the rear end of the truck bed. This thing was solid, the body thick steel.

About Lloyd Kahn

Lloyd Kahn started building his own home in the early '60s and went on to publish books showing homeowners how they could build their own homes with their own hands. He got his start in publishing by working as the shelter editor of the Whole Earth Catalog with Stewart Brand in the late '60s. He has since authored six highly-graphic books on homemade building, all of which are interrelated. The books, "The Shelter Library Of Building Books," include Shelter, Shelter II (1978), Home Work (2004), Builders of the Pacific Coast (2008), Tiny Homes (2012), and Tiny Homes on the Move (2014). Lloyd operates from Northern California studio built of recycled lumber, set in the midst of a vegetable garden, and hooked into the world via five Mac computers. You can check out videos (one with over 450,000 views) on Lloyd by doing a search on YouTube:

One Response to Attention Car Nuts: 1930s Cord (810/812),1939 Studebaker Pickup Truck

  1. A friend of mine has a much more rusty Studebaker pickup, but not in this swooping style. What a great truck (awesome car too).

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