Tiny Cabin, Giant View

Mike Basich was our #1 featured builder in Tiny Homes. Two weeks ago, the Wall Street Journal came out with an article on Mike and his cabin, written by Conor Dougherty, with 15 photos by Jason Henry. Mike’s got an old ski lift that he’s rebuilding so he can ride up and ski down. A remarkable guy. Article here.

Mike is very media-savvy and documented the construction of his cabin in this book called “The Making of a Dream, viewable here.”

About Lloyd Kahn

Lloyd Kahn started building his own home in the early '60s and went on to publish books showing homeowners how they could build their own homes with their own hands. He got his start in publishing by working as the shelter editor of the Whole Earth Catalog with Stewart Brand in the late '60s. He has since authored six highly-graphic books on homemade building, all of which are interrelated. The books, "The Shelter Library Of Building Books," include Shelter, Shelter II (1978), Home Work (2004), Builders of the Pacific Coast (2008), Tiny Homes (2012), and Tiny Homes on the Move (2014). Lloyd operates from Northern California studio built of recycled lumber, set in the midst of a vegetable garden, and hooked into the world via five Mac computers. You can check out videos (one with over 450,000 views) on Lloyd by doing a search on YouTube:

4 Responses to Tiny Cabin, Giant View

  1. Anonymous says:

    beautiful. have always loved anything made with "rocks"…interesting write up in the paper.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Good looking home. Not sure how stone homes are built but are rocks lined up with a wood frame until it's filled?

  3. bayrider says:

    The WSJ is one of the last great papers but unfortunately they didn't showcase the cabin very well, they used that image of the back side as the primary photo instead of showing the beautiful and impressive glass side.

    You did a much better job in Tiny Homes. Mike's place is my favorite tiny home for sure!

  4. izzit says:

    One neat thing about the WSJ article is that they said HOW he did/does it – how a guy who snowboards ended up a real-estate mogul with his vacation trips paid for. (Like, it's more helpful for young adults to know that Thoreau got some land lent to him by mentors, had visitors, went into town sometimes, and ended up in a tax dispute – that it wasn't all nuts&berries… )
    I imagine if in the 1990's Mike had gone and "gotten a REAL job", he would much farther behind (after two recessions!) Good article about following your bliss, and seeing opportunities, without being unrealistic.

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