The Return of Teardrop Trailers

“Here’s an item from America’s past I would not have imagined would make a comeback: The teardrop trailer. First produced during the Great Depression and designed in the Streamline Moderne style, the towable campers were lightweight, economical alternatives to full-sized trailers. They typically offered sleeping/lounging space, storage, and a makeshift cooking/food prep surface. Gas prices being what they are these days, teardrop trailers are back in vogue; some models are so light they can be towed by microcars and even motorcycles.…” Posted by hipstomp, 23 Jan 2012

https://shltr.net/xMnbs3

Thanks to John Norton for this

About Lloyd Kahn

Lloyd Kahn started building his own home in the early '60s and went on to publish books showing homeowners how they could build their own homes with their own hands. He got his start in publishing by working as the shelter editor of the Whole Earth Catalog with Stewart Brand in the late '60s. He has since authored six highly-graphic books on homemade building, all of which are interrelated. The books, "The Shelter Library Of Building Books," include Shelter, Shelter II (1978), Home Work (2004), Builders of the Pacific Coast (2008), Tiny Homes (2012), and Tiny Homes on the Move (2014). Lloyd operates from Northern California studio built of recycled lumber, set in the midst of a vegetable garden, and hooked into the world via five Mac computers. You can check out videos (one with over 450,000 views) on Lloyd by doing a search on YouTube:

2 Responses to The Return of Teardrop Trailers

  1. Lloyd, you had one of these on an earlier post and I've been researching these on the net and what a blast. I found out from my brother that my dad built one in 1945 and traveled to Colorado. I sooooooo loved that trip and didn't know why I was drawn to that first TEARDROP trailer you posted. I'm a thinking that I want to make one myself. thanks for more ideas AS ALWAYS…aloha, irene

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