The Half Acre Homestead in the 21st Century

On Tuesday I did a talk/slide show titled “The Half Acre Homestead in the 21st Century” at St. Mary’s College in Moraga, Calif. The course was titled “Shelter,” inspired by our 1973 book of the same name, and taught by Kristen Sbrogna.

This is the 2nd presentation I’ve done on the subject; the first was at the Maker Faire last year in San Mateo. I started creating a home and surroundings 50 years ago, have gone through a lot of trials and tribulations as they say, and felt that my experiences might be of interest to anyone attempting to evade the bank/mortgage or high rent syndrome of getting a roof over one’s head.

Above: one of the slides, showing our kitchen dish drying/storage rack, built years ago by Lew Lewandowski. Dishes are slid into slots as soon as rinsed and remain there until used again.

About Lloyd Kahn

Lloyd Kahn started building his own home in the early '60s and went on to publish books showing homeowners how they could build their own homes with their own hands. He got his start in publishing by working as the shelter editor of the Whole Earth Catalog with Stewart Brand in the late '60s. He has since authored six highly-graphic books on homemade building, all of which are interrelated. The books, "The Shelter Library Of Building Books," include Shelter, Shelter II (1978), Home Work (2004), Builders of the Pacific Coast (2008), Tiny Homes (2012), and Tiny Homes on the Move (2014). Lloyd operates from Northern California studio built of recycled lumber, set in the midst of a vegetable garden, and hooked into the world via five Mac computers. You can check out videos (one with over 450,000 views) on Lloyd by doing a search on YouTube:

4 Responses to The Half Acre Homestead in the 21st Century

  1. I would love to see your slides, and if there were a way to access a video of your talk, or even your notes from the talk, that would be amazing! Is this a possibility?

    Thanks for sharing alternative paths for living!

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