Renovation of Timber Frame Church in Santa Barbara

Bob Easton, who designed (and did all the hand-lettered headlines and drawings of small buildings) in Shelter with me in 1973, has been an architect ever since, and today sent me this note, along with this photo:

“…got busy this week, in the middle of renovating 120-year-old Episcopal church here in Montecito.”

The church was apparently designed by Arthur Benton in 1900.

About Lloyd Kahn

Lloyd Kahn started building his own home in the early '60s and went on to publish books showing homeowners how they could build their own homes with their own hands. He got his start in publishing by working as the shelter editor of the Whole Earth Catalog with Stewart Brand in the late '60s. He has since authored six highly-graphic books on homemade building, all of which are interrelated. The books, "The Shelter Library Of Building Books," include Shelter, Shelter II (1978), Home Work (2004), Builders of the Pacific Coast (2008), Tiny Homes (2012), and Tiny Homes on the Move (2014). Lloyd operates from Northern California studio built of recycled lumber, set in the midst of a vegetable garden, and hooked into the world via five Mac computers. You can check out videos (one with over 450,000 views) on Lloyd by doing a search on YouTube:

3 Responses to Renovation of Timber Frame Church in Santa Barbara

  1. Fred says:

    Looks more like a steel post and beam than a timber frame in this picture

  2. Peter says:

    I think you are right. I was wondering about how the hammer beams in the roof were supposed to work, as they seem to be unsupported. They are probably purely decorative and the entire structural load is born by the steel posts and beams. However, it looks beautiful and they seem to be doing an excellent job.

  3. Ries Niemi says:

    It seismic reinforcement- hence the addition of steel, and new foundations.
    https://www.noozhawk.com/article/all_saints_by_the_sea_episcopal_church_sanctuary_seismic_upgrade_20190124

Leave a Reply

Please use your real name instead of your company name or keyword spam.