Anyone know what these #mushrooms are? Can’t find in books. Very solid , heavy, growing in chanterelle territory…

About Lloyd Kahn

Lloyd Kahn started building his own home in the early '60s and went on to publish books showing homeowners how they could build their own homes with their own hands. He got his start in publishing by working as the shelter editor of the Whole Earth Catalog with Stewart Brand in the late '60s. He has since authored six highly-graphic books on homemade building, all of which are interrelated. The books, "The Shelter Library Of Building Books," include Shelter, Shelter II (1978), Home Work (2004), Builders of the Pacific Coast (2008), Tiny Homes (2012), and Tiny Homes on the Move (2014). Lloyd operates from Northern California studio built of recycled lumber, set in the midst of a vegetable garden, and hooked into the world via five Mac computers. You can check out videos (one with over 450,000 views) on Lloyd by doing a search on YouTube:

11 Responses to Anyone know what these #mushrooms are? Can’t find in books. Very solid , heavy, growing in chanterelle territory…

  1. At first glance, they look like the giant puffball, but they have structure inside, and may possibly be buttons of the poisonous fly agaric, which look like puffballs. Puffball sites warn us about those.

  2. Definitely look like some sort of cap mushroom that hasn't fully developed yet. Any chance you can post more pictures once some finish growing?

    We used to find lots of Panther Agarics in the Columbia gorge (https://www.google.com/search?q=panther+agaric&tbm=isch&imgil=WOctkbG3r9dqFM%253A%253BEXRyDf8kH1-CAM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.tacethno.com%25252Fpantherina-panther-amanita-mushrooms.html&source=iu&pf=m&fir=WOctkbG3r9dqFM%253A%252CEXRyDf8kH1-CAM%252C_&usg=__2lXb-2IP8rlBlb2z4bqkTsZM0vg%3D&biw=1680&bih=821&ved=0ahUKEwi2wKa7hJHQAhXqi1QKHU3kC1UQyjcIMg&ei=bYIdWPbVF-qX0gLNyK-oBQ#imgrc=WOctkbG3r9dqFM%3A) that looked kind of like that before the caps finished emerging.

  3. Lloyd,
    got me curious over these…Can you send this photo on to some mushroom expert/biologist etc, to see if you can educate us all on this?

  4. Definitely Amanita species in it's button stage, might be A. caesarea, which is an excellent edible. Wait till they are fully grown for definite ID.

  5. I agree with Amanita ID. Some Amanita are delicious, others are deadly. Needs to be fully grown to identify, these are in their classic "egg" stage. There are some great mushroom ID groups on Facebook with real mycologists.

  6. sigh..thanks for hunting up the info Lloyd…(of course it is to your advantage to know you are not eating poison, grin)…

    I am sure your botanist friend is knowledgeable/correct…
    (and take this from someone who pretty much has only eaten packaged mushrooms from the grocers)

    they still look like potatoes with warts to me…

    Seems like you have scored on finding them…enjoy

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